Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

Considered a brilliant feat of 19th-century engineering, the Brooklyn Bridge was a bridge of many firsts. It was the first suspension bridge to use steel for its cable wire. It was the first bridge to use explosives in a dangerous underwater device called a caisson. At the time it was built, the 3,460-foot Brooklyn Bridge was also crowned the longest suspension bridge in the world. Without a doubt, the Brooklyn Bridge remains one of New York City’s most celebrated architectural wonders.


Designed by the brilliant engineer John Augustus Roebling and completed by his equally ingenious son Washington Roebling, this elegant structure was, at the time of its completion in 1883, the longest suspension bridge in the world. Anchored across the lower East River by two neo-Gothic towers and a delicate lacework of steel-wire cables, the soaring lines of the Brooklyn Bridge have inspired countless architects, engineers, painters and poets to pursue their own expressions of creative excellence.

Location: City Hall Park, Manhattan to Cadman Plaza, Brooklyn